Animal Painting – Blue Note Guys

original raw art, urban folk art, unique animal painting, artist Sarah Gilbert Fox
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Copyright @ Sarah Gilbert Fox

Abstract Painting – Blue Note Guys

About this painting

I fell in love with phthalo blues (the green and the red shades). Then, by accident, I purchased some Golden interference colors (blue, violet, green, violet green, green bluered). A happy madness took over and suddenly I was breaking away from doing mixed media paintings of my animals (the process of building things on canvas is such a pleasure) and instead began to build color on top of interference on top of color. Suddenly only paint was going on my canvas – a lot of paint.

original raw art, urban folk art, unique animal painting, artist Sarah Gilbert Fox
Blue Note Guys © Sarah Gilbert

My go-to paint brands are predominately Golden and Liquitex. Sometimes Utrecht, Blick and Sennelier creep in there, too. The brushes used are whatever is hanging around not covered in paint.

I also use a lot of cotton cloths to blend the paint around. Oh, yes, and my trusty spatula knife.

Almost all of my paintings are finished off with my own painting-framing technique, which allows the paintings to be hung without frames. The process is organic, with me putting a lot of Payne’s gray in the palm of my hands, and then palming the color around the sides of the painting – bleeding over the edge a bit – so the sides of the painting are black. Payne’s gray was the first paint I used to do this, and it’s sort of a good luck thing. I like to think that the luck is passed onto whomever is looking at the paintings. The buyers who have decided to have my work frame, tend to use floating frames.

 

This painting also might fall under the following categories

  • original contemporary figurative animal painting
  • contemporary fine art blue painting
  • original animal painting
  • original primitive raw art
  • original blue primitive art
  • original art brut animal
  • unique animal art
  • unique canvas animals
  • blue expressionism animal painting
  • contemporary fine art colorway blue
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Testing of the Strings – Calata ala Spagnola

original raw art, urban folk art, unique animal painting, artist Sarah Gilbert Fox
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Copyright @ Sarah Gilbert Fox

About this painting

Growing up on Maple Street in Columbia, South Carolina was nothing, if not creative. Everyone played some kind of musical instrument. My older sister, Kathy, played the piano and guitar, as did my older brother, Micah. My younger brother, Adam, played anything he could blow air through – oboe, clarinet, recorder, etc. (Santa Claus gave me a Ukelele one Christmas, which is probably why I went into the hand instruments, e.g., the pen and the paintbrush.)  Our mother, Betty Gilbert, sang in the Columbia Chorale Society – she had a gorgeous voice. And we were always rescuing animals. I don’t think a day went by when I wasn’t surrounded by music coming from one instrument or another, while my mother sang at the top of her pipes.  I would mope around, trying not to trip over the cats or dogs, and write really bad love poetry that rhymed.  

Testing of the Strings – Calata ala Spagnola © Sarah Gilbert

Mom never had us on a strict regiment.  She was a full-time, working art educator, raising four children without a father or a father’s financial compensation. We were four, wild ones – climbing in and out of the windows or onto the roof of our huge house (the old Shandon Presbyterian Church), at all hours of the day and night – always making music or creating something.  It was a chaotic childhood, but there was always love and creativity and play.

When I think back on those days, I particularly remember Adam, always playing his recorder for the old women in our family – Aunt Sally and Great Aunt Ella. One day Adam grew up and became a famous recorder player, traveling the world, where he met and married an Israeli woman (Rotem Gilbert) who played the recorder, as well.  Both virtuosos.  Both now teaching at USC’s Thornton School of Music, where Adam is the director of the Early Music Program and Rotem is a professor.  One of their practice songs – where they practiced with one of their former groups, Piffaro, is Calata ala Spagnola. It’s a happy song that reminds me of the those times on Maple Street, when all four of us – arms and legs everywhere – ran amok during our childhood days.

More about the painting Testing of the Strings – Calata ala Spagnola

Calata ala Spagnola
by Joan Ambrosia Dalza   (fl. 1508) arr. Grant Herreid
performance / practice by Piffaro musicians:
• Christa Patton, harp
• Grant Herreid, lute
≥ Rotem & Adam Gilbert, recorders

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Abstract Painting – Walk Along Your Way

original mixed media abstract, contemporary abstract painting, painting with rabbit, painting with unique animal, painting with strange animal, artist sarah gilbert fox, primitive art, raw art
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Copyright @ Sarah Gilbert Fox

About this painting

Walk Along Your Way
an original painting by Sarah Fox

My husband and I spent our honeymoon in Scotland in 2016. We spent the majority of the time in the car with my brother, Micah Gilbert (a musician, songwriter living in Scotland) and his wife, Suzanne Gilbert (a James Hogg scholar at the University of Stirling), trying to chase the Northern Lights.

original mixed media abstract, contemporary abstract painting, painting with rabbit, painting with unique animal, painting with strange animal, artist sarah gilbert fox, primitive art, raw art
Walk Along Your Way © Sarah Gilbert

On the first leg of our trip, we took the car on a ferry, disembarked and drove from the top of the Mesolithic Outer Hebrides to see the craggy rocks of the Butt of Lewis and the mysterious Callanish Stones (much older and less
touristy than Stonehenge
), to the quiet and wild Luskentyre Beach, then to find some Harris Tweed on the Isle of Harris. Whenever possible, we were searching for the Northern Lights. But no luck. So we caught another car ferry to the southern Hebrides to see the rare Eriskay Ponies. Still no Northern Lights’ luck.

Our last day in Scotland began with a car ferry back to Uig on the Isle of Skye, where we explored the gorgeous Scottish village of Plockton (think the Hamish McBeth TV series) and then the equally gorgeous, shore-lined, colorful village of Portree (think Scottish Calmac Ferries and Donovan’s Lochbay Boathouse).

Then we packed our suitcases, had dinner and enjoyed a glass of unpeated single malt scotch whiskey – Bruichladdich, with the funky, cigar-like smell of peat moss burning in the fireplace. (Everyone had made fun of me when I searched madly for – and found – a farmer who gave me a brick.)

After the sun went down, we decided to take one last drive to search for the lights. And suddenly there they were – the Northern Lights – the Aurora Borealis in Scotland – shimmering over the Uig sheep that were scattered about in the middle of the road wondering what all the fuss was about.

Because we had walked so much in Scotland – and we had finally seen the lights – this painting was inspired by one of Micah’s songs: Walk Along Your Way.

More info about the painting Walk Along Your Way

Walk Along Your Way
by Micah Gilbert

 

I’ll walk along your road,
I’ll follow on your way,
Whispering dreams,
singing through the trees,
There’s a turning on the road.

Kick up the dust,
miles ahead of us,
there’s another setting sun.

I’ll walk along your road,
I’ll follow on your way.

I heard your song,
I knew it all along,
It’s forever to be sung.

You can climb
your ladder to the sky.
and I’ll follow on your road.

I’ll walk along your road.

Sing the revolutions churning,
chasing down the day,
rusted signposts in the highway,
we will find our way.

I’ll walk along your road,
I’ll follow on your way,
Whispering dreams,
singing through the trees,
There’s a turning on the road.

Kick up the dust,
miles ahead of us,
there’s another setting sun.

I’ll walk along your road,
I’ll follow on your way.

I’ll walk along your road,
We will find our way,
For another day,
I’ll walk along your road.

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